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Programme TAHITI

Journal Of Edward Bell
Voyage of HMS Chatham to the Pacific Ocean
Vancouver's Expedition
1791-1794


Alexander Turnbull Library
MS –Papers – 6373-46

Visit to Tahiti December 1791-January 1792

 

 


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66                               
                                            

Chatham Island


1791
Novem.r
…were satisfied that they were at no great distance by their cries which we sometimes heard in the Woods. - Here as at our first landing the Boats came easily to the Shore amongst a good deal of Sea Weed. - After leaving what Trinkets we had remaining in the different Canoes we quitted the Shore and went on board. - After we were gone, we saw one man come to the Canoes – the only one we had seen since we had left them “after the Skirmish - ”
Chatham Island lies in 43°. 49’ So. Latitude, and 182°.55’ Et. Longitude – Variation of the Compuss 15°E.tly

 

 

Continuation of the Passage to Otaheite


December – The Boat on her return being immediately hoisted in, we weighted anchor and made Sail and steering Still NE – Carrying an excess of Sail in the day, and shortening it at nights, when a very good look out was always kept - The 2nd of December we made our Longitude at Noon by the mean of Several setts of Lunar Observations 192°.30 Et. – the Lat. Was 40°.13’ So  The Spruce Beer that we brew’d at New Zealand lasted us till the 4th.- it was no doubt of great benefit to the people we had not at this time a man ill, and as we were now once more coming into. Warm Weather the Ships Company had wine servd them instead of Spirits ……..every Sunday Divine Service was performd – This indeed had seldom been omitted in fine weather since our leaving England with

 

[Transcriber’s note: each page of this manuscript has suffered damage three lines from the bottom so that many of the words have been lost in which case they have been replaced in this context with a series of dots.]

                                                                                                                                      

67


From Chatham Island to Otaheite

 

1791
December
With a continuance of our fair Southerly wind which was accompanied with charming Weather we still Shaped our Course NE – and we felt the Heat gradually increase as we decreased our degrees of Latitude – tho’ the Evenings & mornings were yet very cold – we every day pass’d large patches of Rock Weed – and saw great numbers of Whales and Marine Birds – We carried this fine weather till the 6th when we were in the Late.35°.36’ S & Long. About 198° Et. variation of the Compass 10° Etly – at this time we lost the Sly wind and the following day the 7th - we had a Breeze from the No.d  & East.d - which brought with it hazy & Cloudy weather – this wind was against us, we however made the best of it by standing to the Eastward – it continued in this quarter – gradually freshening attended with heavy gloomy weather till the 9th – when after Some hard rain it fell calm; contrary to our hopes & expectations, it came on from the same quarter the next day – and we lay up no better than ENE – we had constant heavy rain – and so very thick and Foggy – that at times we could scarcily see the Vessels length ahead – a very good look out was now perfectly necessary – but few Birds that are in general indications of Land were at this time seen – the Wind had freshend by the 11th - so as to bring us under double reef’d Topsails -  ................................................................................................................gave us observation – when we found ourselves in 36°.53’ So Lat.de On the 12th the wind shifted to the wish’d for Quarter and

 

68


From Chatham Isld to Otaheite


1791
December
and we steerd  N b E with all Sail set – about Noon it blew very moderately at SSW but yet so cloudy that we coud not get an observation – In the afternoon the Clouds began to disperse a little – and we had clear pleasant Weather which continued all the following day (the 13th)  when at noon our Lat.de Was 34°.36’So – and the Longitude 208°.E.t - the Breeze now freshend from the SE Quarter.- Only a very few Albatrosses were seen – We this day open’d a Cask of Sour Kraut that we got at the Cape of Good Hope and which was little inferior to fresh Cabbage  The people seldom or ever woud eat Sour Kraut till it was Boil’d in their Pease Soup – this was done twice a Week – Knowing it to be an excellent Antiscorbutic. – The 14th: - the Breeze continued fresh though gradually drawing forward to the Eastward. - the Board since yesterday gave us at Noon 50 Leagues, which for our Dung Barge was reckon’d tolerable – and as much as we may ever expect to see her go. – We now felt the heat in the middle of the day considerably tho’ yet the Evenings were cool – at Noon we were in the Latitude of 32°.15’So.- Still keeping our NbE Course:- the Wind in the Course of the night had veerd to ENE – blowing pretty fresh and the next morning it was NE b E – bringing with it thick Foggy weather and drizzling rain – in the Course of the day it came at NNE and we stood to the NW after which falling off to WNW we tackd ………………...................................................................………………………………
Hard in Squalls that brought it under close reef’d Topsails and accompanied with Thunder, Lightning & heavy rain – The Squalls were so violent that we were obligd frequently to clew up the

                                                                                                                       

69


Otaheite


1791
Decem.r
the Topsails – we tack’d occasionally – and our Lat.de the 18th was 29°.26’So In the night we had a great deal of hard rain – and the 19th brought no change in the wind or weather – for it was still Gloomy & heavy – the Air was very Sultry, and yet such a dampness prevaild as mildewed every thing in  our Cabbins – we saw some few birds and Some Bonitas and Albacores – Such was our weather till the 20th – when it was Calm – and as it is an old Seafaring phrase “that a Calm is half a fair wind” – we anxiously wish’d for it and it did at last come from the Southward and blew a pleasant Moderate Breeze. - This set us all in high Spirits – after having had only about two days fair wind in the last fortnight – we now made the most of it sett Studding Sails forward & aft and Steerd NbN - at Noon our Lat.de was 29°.10’So & the Longt.de  214°E.t the following day all the Clouds having dispersd the weather was delightful – we saw great numbers of Flying Fish, Bonitas, Dolphins &e- and several Tropic Birds – On the 23rd we discovered an Island bearing about WbS1/2 S 10 Leagues and we were steering then NbW1/2 W – as this Island had never been seen before by any navigator we know of M.r Broughton nam’d it Knight’s Island after Capt.n Knight of the Navy – it seem’d high & appeard about 6 or 7 Leagues in Circumference Its Lat. is (deleted) S.o and Long (deleted) E.t   The 25th being Xmas day the people were allowd every thing in the eatable way that the Ship afforded – but being at Sea had no more Grog given them than …………….. .........................the Customary extra allowance was reservd till we got into Port  - At day light the 26th we saw the Island of Osnaburg bearing EbE 6 Leagues – and about 8 Saw the Island of Otaheite bearing W1/2 N. – by 6 in the evening we were off Tiarraboo

 

70


Otaheite


1791
December 
Tiarraboo – about 4 or 5 miles from the Shore when several Canoes came off with two and three people in them – bringing with them Hogs, Fowls & Cocoa Nuts; we anxiously enquired if there was any Vessel at Matavai Bay, but they told us there was not One of the Canoes having met with an accident we got it on board – and the 3 men belonging to it stayd with us all night We spent the night in standing off and on – and the next morning the 27th we work’d into Matavai Bay where we Anchor’d in 7 fa.m water - In coming into the Bay we had nearly got on the Dolphin Bank - our depth of Water lessening in one Case from 8 to 2 ½ f.ms We immediately put up the Helm and again deepen’d to 8 fa.m We were sorry to find the natives account of there being no Ship here confind’ – the Discovery had not been here, - as she saild much better then we did – and as Matavai was the appointed Rendezvous we were not a little surpris’d at not finding her before us –

 

Transactions during our stay at Otaheite


27th Decem.r – No sooner had we come to an Anchor than our Decks were crowded with natives – indeed as soon as we appeared off Point Venus the Canoes came off in great numbers, and hundred of men & women that cou’d not yet get Canoes swam off to the Vessel They brought with them Hogs, Fowls, Breadfruit, Cocoa Nuts & etc in abundance and readily sold them for trifles Eight Cocoa Nuts were purchased for a Single Bead a Fowl for the Same Sum - and a Hog for a pair of Scissors – this last article was

 

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Otaheite


1791
December 
was in great demand among them – Our rigging & Decks were so thickly cover’d with the Natives that on the Starboard they heeld the Vessel considerably, but as they behaved peacably we permitted them to remain untill a fellow had the impudence to jump overboard with one of the people’s Hammocks from off the Booms – on this we were under the necessity of turning them all out of the Ship – they went out very quietly and staid in their Canoes along side – There was no Chief among them, indeed we afterwards learnt that all the Chiefs were at Eimeo – we ask’d for Otoo, the King – but were inform’d he was at Eimeo and at the Same time press’d us to send a Boat for him to that place we desired them to send for him – to this they said, that he woud not come upon their going for him, and still seem’d urgent that we should send for him – this we should probably have done had not an accident happen’d in the night to the Cutter – During all this & the greatest part of the preceding day we had constant heavy rains which had so much swelld the River that ran abreast of the Beach that in the Afternoon it broke down the Bank that parted it from the Bay and rushed in a rapid torrent into it carrying along with it several very large Trees, at this time there were a vast number of  Natives alongside who on seeing what had happen’d shouted in a kind of extacy and many immediately Paddled for the place where we afterwards saw them from the Ship swimming & playing in the water One of these big Trees in the night came against the
Cutter, and at day light the following morning the 20th she was first observed filld with water, her

 

72


Otaheite


1791
Decemb.r

her stern stove in and all her Oars & Masts etc lost. tho other Boats were immediately sent in quest of these things, but return’d unsuccessful – a continual hard rain all day prevented every kind of duty going forward on board, but it did not hinder the Natives coming off in great numbers, with an abundant supply of Vegetables & Fruit – Several Goats were likewise brought off for sale – they were of the Breed left here by Capt.n. Cook and seem’d to thrive very well This day Otoo E’etee (or young Otoo) the King’s son sent a messenger on board with a present of two fine Hogs & some fruit, the man on entering the Ship laid the leaf of a Plantain Tree at the Captain’s feet – making at the same time a long oration which though unintelligible to us we construed into professions of amity & peacable intentions – he was at Oparré & intended coming to Matavai in a Couple of days. In the evening the Capt.n went on shore and was met on the Beach by a vast concourse of the Inhabitants who seem’d to vie with each other, in shewing them every attention & kindness – as it rain’d hard they cou’d not proceed far & soon return’d on board – We were surprized to day at seeing alongside in a double Canoe, three women, all dress’d in White Linen shirts, and having each a fine young child in their arms, perfectly white - we ask’d them in & found they were women who had Cohabited with some of the Bounty’s Mutineer’s and these little ones were the offspring of their Amours; the women call’d themselves by the

                                                                                                                                  

73           

                           
Otaheite


1791
Decem.r
the names of those with whom they had lived, with the addition of a Christian name – one call’d herself Peggy Stewart, after Mr Stewart, one of the Bounty’s Midshipmen and her child which was very beautiful was calld Charlotte another’s name was Mary MacIntosh – and another’s Mary Bocket – On making some inquiry respecting Bligh’s business – poor Peggy Stewart burst into Tears, she well knew the impropriety of the Mutineer’s conduct, and dreaded the consequence – she frequently ask’d if Stewart would be hung, and at those times burst into a flood of Tears; - she inform’d us that the Pandora had been here and had taken 13 of the Bounty’s people, and sail’d from hence about 8 months ago, but that Christian and the remainder of the Mutineers were not taken – having gone away with the Bounty from Otaheite  a considerable time before the Pandora arrived, & had not return’d since – She pleaded the two Midshipmen Stewart & Heyward’s part very Strongly – and endeavour’d to impress us with an idea that they were in no way concerned in the Mutiny – and that they were both asleep when the plot was put in execution against Bligh, how far this account is true will be best Known hereafter – but be that as it may – Christian she told us left a Letter when he was ..............................................himself & the others from any hand in the business, and which letter was for the person who might come in search of them, should such be

 

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Otaheite


1791
December
be ever the case. – It seem’d from the accounts we collected from differents of the Natives – that the Bounty’s people had never in the most distant manner hinted their intentions of returning, but that they were very much surpriz’d on seeing them come back – on their asking them where they had been and where Bligh was – they endeavoured to to make them believe they had been to England but this the natives had sagacity enough to see through & would not believe it – they then made another story, which was certainly a very feasible one, that they had met the Resolution & Discovery and that Bligh with the rest of the People went in her and sent them on discoveries – finding however that the natives begun to have suspicions of the truth of this – or from some other cause they did not make any great stoppage here, but taking their Girls with them, went away with the Vessel to Toboui – a neighbouring Island with an intention of Settling there; but at this place they did not remain long; for having a quarrel with the Natives they were oblig’d to leave it, and return’d to Otaheite Whether it was now their intention to settle there or not I cou’d not discover – but Christian and the Crew had many quarrels among themselves. Churchill the Master at Arms and the Boatswain’s Mate having a dispute they determin’d to decide it with Pistols in the fashionable way – and accordingly met near Point Venus – where they fought and the Boatswain’s mate was shot upon which the
                                                                                      

75


Otaheite


the Natives fell upon Churchill and kill’d him – why they took Churchill’s life I do not know – unless it was that they liked the Boatswain’s mate, and dislikd the other – for they all said Churchill was “Enoe warry – warry” - that is a rascal, a bad man – Not long after this – the Bounty being at Anchor in the the Bay – Christian with 8 or nine hands – one night privately carried her to Sea, which was the last they saw of them, leaving behind them Steward and Heyward & 11 more hands – they had attempted to weigh their Anchor, but not being able, they cut the Cable without an Anchor on board – The party that was left behind were not idle, they built a small Vessel of the Breadfruit  Tree – which all the natives described as being about size of the Marquee (with the Bottom turn’d upper most ) in which they went with Pomarre – and his Fleet against a refactory Chief on the other side of the Island - and with the help of the Arms they had among them gain’d a Victory – this piece of Service, with many others, and the general tenor of their Conduct procurd them the esteem & friendship of the King and the Inhabitants Stewart & Heyward laid out Gardens that were yet in a thriving state. Though it certainly was only what was proper that these people should be brought to Justice, yet had they staid at Otaheite (at.....................................................................................................................................the general opinion that they would have been of infinite Service to the Country – and have been the means of bringing

76
Otaheite
1791
December
bringing to perfection & hereafter stocking the Island with several useful Fruits, plants & Shrubs, Vegetables &e. – all this was in their power, and they left sufficient proof of these not having neglected this while they staid for some time Lemon & Orange Trees – with Some Pineapples, Chilly Peppers Indian Corn &e. were in a flourishing state in Stewarts Garden They had each taken a wife to whom they were constant & well behaved and besides those Children I have already mention’d – there were some more in the Island by some of these Men & by a Man of the name of Brown, who had been left there by Capt.n Cox of the Mercury – Stewart & Heyward had we learnt so far conform’d to the manners & Customs of those they lived amongst – that they always uncover’d to Otoo, the Same as the Natives:-
Thus they had lived till the Pandora arrived in the Bay – upon which Stewart & Heyward readily conceiving her errand – before the Ship was well at Anchor went on board, and in a proper manner deliver’d themselves up – the others were not so prudent, but when the party from the Pandora went ashore to take them - they foolishly resisted, having themselves some fire Arms, and a few of the Natives on their side – but their resistance was vain for they were Soon taken...................................................................On the arrival of the Pandora two or 3 of the people put to sea in the Small Vessel – but returning to another part of the Island Capt.n Edwards got intelligence of it and Sent


77


Otaheite


1791 
December
his Boats after them – but they had gone away again, and after staying out two days, again return’d and were surprized by the Pandora’s Boats who immediately took them; The Man left by Cox - (Brown) – was also taken away by Capt.n Edwards – After a stay of about a month at Mativai Bay, the Pandora sail’d, taking with her the little Vessel built by the Mutineers, intending to look for the Bounty and the remainder of the Crew at the neighbouring Island:- Oididdee (the man who went home with Capt.n Cook in the Endeavour) went in the Pandora to the other Islands - This was all that I was able to collect respecting these unfortunate people - the most part of whom were – I am inclined to think led astray by – Christian, whose conduct proves him to be one of the most
inhuman Villains that ever existed – pity it is that he was not taken, at his death I should feel no regret – but I own I shou’d be extremely happy to hear that the Midshipmen’s lives were sav’d and that their innocence could be proved.

29th  The rain still continued with a heavy Swell rolling into the Bay – we however had as usual a numerous attendance of visitors of both Sexes – Peggy Stewart came on board with a handsome present to the Capt.n of Cloth, Fruit etc – and some very excellent Taro ready dress’d The first we had seen here, on our expressing a liking for this Vegetable, she promis’d to bring us Some every day whilst we staid – about Noon the rain ceased & the weather began to clear up – Otoo Eteé, sent this day a

 

78


Otaheite


1791
December
a very beautiful present to the Captain – consisting of two very large fat Hogs (alive) and a large Barbacued one together with an immense quantity of Bread fruit, Cocoa Nuts &e. – and at the Same time sent a message saying that he shou’d be at Matavai the next day and expected to see the Captain onshore – whilst I was walking the Deck a Man came alongside in a double Canoe, and getting out of her, he stopp’d me, began wrapping me up in a fine Cloth till I was as large round the midle as a Beer But; he then order’d in a very large Hog & some Plantains, Cocoa Nuts &e. that were in the Canoe which he presented me with for “Tyo”/friendship/ he then insisted on Changing names with me, which is the Custom allways observed here, when the man professes himself your friend – Puida, for that was my Tyo’s name lived at Oparré which is about 4 miles from Matavai – notwithstanding which he wou’d frequently make two or three trips to the Ship in a day when I express’d a wish for any particular thing he could bring me, and indeed I had no reason to be dissatisfied with my friend, for there was scarce a day that he did not come on board with some present or another, and I allways found him very moderate in his demands. Indeed there was now scarce a person of any description in the Ship, who had not a pro..........................................................................................................................were many days that we had no occasion to buy any articles of Fruit or provisions for the Ship but thought we did

                                                                                                                       

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Otaheite


1791
December
did not actually barter for these things, yet it amounted to much the same thing, for your friend of course expects a Return and it generally was full as much as what the articles would have cost along side - This being now the third day since our arrival and no Discovery in Sight we began to be rather apprehensive of her safety – we were however relieved from these apprehensions soon for several of the Natives the next morning the 30th – came off and told us there was a Ship in sight round the point – the Boat was immediately dispatched to the point and her return confirm’d the report of the natives, and very soon after we had the pleasure of seeing the Discovery off Point Venus – and in about an hour she Anchor’d close to us.
The two Captains immediately went onshore to wait on Otoo Eteé who had previously sent off a message to Capt.n Broughton acquainting him of his arrival at Matavai, they took with them as a present some Red & White Cloth, Axes &e. – They found him in state anxiously waiting their arrival, he had a piece of European Scarlet Cloth adorn’d with the feathers of Birds etc thrown over his Shoulders & he was mounted upon a Man’s Shoulders he graciously received his visitors, as also their presents with which he appear’d infinitely pleased – After this Ceremony was over and he had given Capt.n Vancouver a present of some Hogs &e. they parted and he return’d immediately to the Royal residence at Oparré, The Captains then went in search of a convenient place for erecting the Observatory & Tents for carrying on the different

 

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Otaheite


1791
December
different necessary operations intended on shore, having pitchd on a spot they both return’d to the Discovery – and Capt.n Vancouver dispatch’d the Pinnace, with M.r Mudge the 1st Lieutenant & M.r Menzies the Botanist to Eimeo for the old King. –
This being the first fine day since our arrived induced many new faces to come off to the Ships and among them that appear’d a greater proportion of females – who were anxious to ingrate themselves in our favour, and extremely willing to give us their Company, besides the Articles of provisions they brought off for Sale a large Stock of Cloth & different other curiosities of the Country – and they wou’d have readily parted with these for trifles – had not a prohibition been laid in such commerce An order was read on board both Ships to that effect until a sufficient supply of refreshments were procured for each Ship; when a certain time wou’d be allow’d to purchase these Curiosities – and for the better putting these restrictions into execution one person in each Ship was appointed to conduct the market for refreshments – A clause was also inserted for bidding the people selling their Cloathes – and the Artificers their Tools, upon pain of severe punishment. These regulations were but proper, and they were found to be strictly attended to.

31st            Having....Sails ..that were unbent and the Yards & Topmasts struck, the running rigging ....&e. My friend Puidu brought me this day a handsome present of a large Hog, Fruit &e. This being his third Hog, besides abundance of  

                                                                                                                                

81
Otaheite


1791
December
of other things – I thought it was high time for me to make my present, and taking him below I shewd him an Axe at the sight of which was he transported with joy – and when he got it into his possession, he jumpt about like a child. – There being such an ample supply of the different refreshments of the Island, the people were not restricted in the Articles of Fish Pork &e. &e. but their allowance of Ships Provisions of all kinds was stopp’d – the Bread Fruit was so well liked that it was prefer’d by the Officers to Bread Since the Discovery’s  arrival the price of Cocoa Nuts was rais’d for instead of eight for a Bead, we now got but five, but this was not once varied during the remainder of our stay-

 

1792
January
On New Years day – the Crews of both Ships were served an extra allowance of Grog – in order as Capt.n Cook says that they might not forget their old Sweethearts  in England among the pretty Girls of Otaheite - This day – a great chief nam’d Wytua a brother of the King’s went on board the Discovery with hs wife (one of the handsomest women in the Island) and made Capt.n Vancouver a present of Hogs, fruit &e. on their first entering the Ship they wrapp’d several large pieces of Cloth of the best kind round all the Gentlemen that were on the Quarter Deck – Suitable presents were return’d them by Capt.n  Vancouver amongst which to the ..................................................................this shirt on and a handsome Necklace that was also given her she indeed look’d beautiful, She had very fine Eyes and Teeth her    

 

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Otaheite


1792
January
her long Black Hair was Curl’d in the front with becoming taste, her face was well form’d and her skin remarkably smooth, all which added to a sweetness of Countenance and an Air of Majesty in her deportment render’d her an object of general admiration [Being one day on board the Chatham, and finding herself rather warm, with the utmost Sang froid, & without the smallest idea of any immodesty or impropriety, she before every person took off her Shirt and appeard down to her waist perfectly naked – and I think I never saw a finer figure – such perfect symmetry & regularity in her Shape]
Wytua aske’d for Some ‘Ava no Britanne’ (Wine ) and Some was put before him, but helping himself rather too freely he was Soon reeling drunk, - but before he quitted the Ship got tolerably sober.-
I had nearly forgot to mention that the Discovery besides falling in with “the Snares” off New Zealand – early in the morning of the same day that we saw them; discover’d on the 23rd of December an Inhabited Island call’d by the Natives Oparra – situated in the Lat.d 27° 36’ So and Long.e 215°. 57’ Et it was about four miles in length  and about 9 in Circumference. – a great number of its Inhabitants came off to the Ship and several after a very little persuasion ventur’d on board they were stout & well made - they went perfectly naked not having even their privates cover’d - their Colour was much the same as the generality of the Inhabitants of the South Sea Islands Their Canoes were of wood, remarkably neat & small and resembled the

 

83


Otaheite


1792
January
the canoes of the Sandwich Islands, by the description of those in Cook’s voyage – They were not Tattow’d (or punctured in the Skin) nor did they seem to understand the Otaheite Language; Seeing some Hogs on board they made them understand there were plenty such on Shore, but no Fowls they shew’d a strong propensity to Thieving  - but no very little idea of bartering – The Discovery did not come to an anchor there, nor send any Boats on Shore. – They had seen neither Chatham, nor Knight’s Islands.

2nd      This morning at day light, the Tents were carried on shore and erected on a plain on the Banks of the River, about 200 yards from Point Venus – the plain was pleasantly Situated and well adapted for all our purposes – the Ground was clear and level with the Bay in front and a charming freshwater river in the rear, - and when every thing was Set up it had the appearance of a Small encampment – besides the Observatory and the Captain’s Marquee, there was a Tent for the Officers – and two large Tents for the people employ’d ashore, and for working in. Three Brass fieldpieces & 4 pounders were sent on shore & mounted and a party of Marines from the Vessel was sent to do duty at the Camp. - The two Capt.ns resided on shore, and the Command was given to M.r Puget 2nd Lieut.t of the Discovery, five midshipmen were likewise sent on shore – and M.r Whidbey the .......................allotted the department of the Observatory where the Astronomical Quadrant was set up for the purpose of determining the

 

84                


Otaheite


1792
January
rate of the Watches. About Noon – Otoo the King (or Pomarre for that is his name now, his son whom I have call’d Otoo Etée having arrived at an Age when it is the custom here to take on him his father’s name ) arrived in the Pinnace from Eimeo.
On going along side the Discovery he was Saluted with 4 Guns from each Vessel he made a long speech to Capt.n Vancouver from the Boat which he answer’d him, in which he was dictated by one of the High Priests who was aboard at the time, - the Subject was merely assurances of friendship on both Sides – Pomarre & Capt.n           
V then exchang’d names and the ceremony being over he went on board. Both he and several of the people remember’d (or  pretended to remember) Capt.n V when he was  a midshipment with Capt.n Cook,  indeed it is not unlikely, as he was with him in his two last Voyages in the course of which he was at Otaheite three times Pomarre brought with him the Picture of Capt.n Cook drawn by M.r Webber in his last call here and given to him as is mention’d in the voyage – to it he was very much attach’d and never went any where without it – on the back was written the arrival & time of sailing of all of his Majesty’s Vessels at Otahiete since Cook was there – this Picture was in very good Condition – it was left on board the Discovery till the time of our sailing which with the time of our arrival was inserted & deliver’d back to Pomarre. – The King woud not come in the Pinnace without being allow’d to bring wih him the Chief of Eimeo Matuara – mahow - whom he was particularly attach’d


85


Otaheite


1792
January
attach’d, to and who was at the point of death, he was a miserable object, for he was worn down to a Skeleton, and cou’d not move himself in the smallest degree – his Wife a fine woman came with and paid him a care & attention that was highly commendable - and Pomarre’s assiduity in paying him his last friendly attention was such that he never stept from his side during this situation – it was however, very perceptible that he could live but a very few days – On looking for our Ensign when going to Salute Pomarre we were surprized to to find that it had been stolen and indeed we never got it again. –
Wytua, or as we now call’d him for Shortness Watty – brought Capt.n     Broughton a present and professed himself his Tyo – in which they chang’d names – Watty to Strengthen his professions – took off a hearty Glass of Ava Britanné; - he was indeed a rich soul-
3rd      we had today an alteration in our weather, the Sky became overcast, and we had some smart showers of rain. The frame of a small Boat (in lieu of our old one which we lost off New Zealand) which had lain getting ready by the Carpenters before our arrival at this place was taken on Shore to be set up – About Noon Pomarre went on shore to the Camp for the first time – and on his leaving the Discovery was saluted with 4 Guns, on his landing he was likewise Saluted by the Guns at the Camp and reciev’d with a Guard. – On the arrival of the Vessels there was scarce a man in either that could be call’d very ill there were three or four with slight complaints, those were

 

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were sent on Shore to take the benefit of the Air, and in a very little time they were all perfectly recovered. These however were the only people out of either Ships who were permitted to go on shore except on duty during the whole time of their stay, these were the orders of Capt.n Vancouver – and indeed I cannot but take the liberty of declaring that in my opinion ( and it was also the opinion of many others) these orders were unjust.
When we consider for a moment, how very anxious every person must be to get ashore - and what a relaxation it must be, after having been five weeks at Sea – and more especially when at Such a place as Otaheite – one of the most charming Countries in the world, – Why should poor Sailors who have as little pleasure, and as much hard work as most people be debarr’d those recreations which they see every Officer on board enjoy? and, why, one enjoy it more than another? Exclusive of those considerations, I should conceive, on the score of health alone, that they shou’d have the benefit of fresh air and exercise – Captain Vancouver’s motive was nevertheless good, for he was apprehensive of quarrels happening between the Sailors & the Natives. – My opinion of the natives however, is such that I think I wou’d  answer for their not being aggressors and as to the Sailors I am inclin’d to think as there are no Grog-Shops ashore to stop at, they wou’d be equally .......................................
In the Evening we received a visit from a Chief nam’d Huripia – the eldest brother of the King – this man was the great friend of Capt.n Clark & even now went by his name Tutée.

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4th      This was a very disgreeable day. the Wind blew pretty fresh into the Bay, accompanied with a heavy swell from the Westw.d  and a great deal of hard rain indeed so boisterous was the weather, that scarce a Canoe ventur’d off to either Ships – but so many constant in their attention were Some of our Tyo’s that several of that description swam off to the Vessels with Bunches of Cocoa Nuts slung around them – they told us that as they knew no Canoes coud venture off to bring us any thing, they fear’d we might be in want of Cocoa Nuts – among these was my good friend Puida who had walked with his Cocoa Nuts from Oparré & afterwards swam off with them for me. It happen’d that we had plenty of every thing remaining on board for the Ships Company –
In the night there was no abatement of the rain and the Cutter that had only the day before been repair’d of the damage she sustain’d the first night, was stove against the Ship’s side by a Sea.
5th    The bad weather had a good deal abated by the morning and the Cutter was sent on shore & haul’d up to be repair’d we had a good number of Canoes off with a Reasonable Supply of all kinds of refreshments. As we had now a good Stock of Hogs we began Salting Pork and follow’d the method pointed out by Capt.n Cook; but .....the ...weather the great heat, or from being our first attempt - I cannot tell, we however did not succeed at first and our Small stock of Salt prevented our Curing more than 2 good Casks of Pork- Peggy

 

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Peggy Stewart came today with a present and as usual brought her Child with her, She was much distress’d by Captain Vancouver’s telling her - that Stewart & Heywood wou’d be hung on their arrival in England with the other Mutineers – we had always told her that we did not know whether they wou’d or not loose their lives, but though she did not altogether believe what Capt.n Vancouver had told her – she had very great doubts on the Subject –
The high priests by order of Pomarre this day made an offering for fine weather to the Eatooa (or God) consisting of a Hog, a Dog & a Fowl – and on their return from the Ceremony – the Priest gave out that the God had accepted the Sacrifice & promis’d them fine weather on the fourth day. – Contrary however to the Otaheitian Oracle the following day, the 6th - we had a very Charming day and Pomarre with his Wives and a vast train of Royalty honor’d us with a visit – to all of whom Capt.n B    
made presents – being about the peoples dinner time the Royal Ladies did not scruple going amongst them and partaking of their Fare -
The Union Jack of an Ensign was this day brought to us by a Chief of the name of Herau who came round in the Vessel from Tiarraboo, supposing it to be part
..................................................................................................................................kept it, as it most likely had been stolen from Some other Vessel – whether the man Knew it was not ours or not I

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I cannot tell, but he persisted in Saying it was ours. -
7th      Charming weather I went with a party to take a walk, and for the first time since our arrival went beyond the Camp – Our walk was delightful; when we Set out we were followed by a vast number of the Natives but intimating to them that such a number was unpleasant – many of them left us and those who follo’d kept at a very respectable distance – Toweraroo who was one of our party, was the person who attracted the most considerable number – he was dress’d in a flaming Scarlet Coat – and being somewhat vain, and very liberal of his riches, he of course had many followers, whenever we stopp’d a crowd regularly gather’d round him, which pleas’d him, and he wou’d sit down and converse with them any length of time – they had been made to believe that he was a great Chief of Morotai – and this made them even think more of him – We pass’d on by the Banks of the River that runs through the delightful Plains of Matavai the different Scenes that presented themselves to our view were truly picturesque and beautiful – At one particular spot on the Banks of this River - I think I never beheld a Sweeter prospect – the River is between 20 & thirty yards wide, running in a winding direction and nearly at the head of it a beautiful Cascade which comes from the Top of a high Mountain empties itself into it – the ground was well shaded by the


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the Cocoa Nuts and Bread fruit Trees which grow very thick, and interspersed among these Groves of Trees are the Houses of the Natives – and their little plantations contiguous to them were neatly rail’d in with Bamboo Canes – By the Sides of the Hills as we pass’d along we also met with plantations neatly rail’d in, in the Same manner which consisted of the Cloth plant, Taro, Plantations &e.-
We were shewn a Garden planted by Christian, (or as he was here calld Petriana) but it was quite over grown with weeds. In several places they also shew’d Tobacci trees been first brought here by Captain Cook. The weather was exceeding Sultry and feeling ourselves dry & a little fatigued – we stopp’d at a House where we were instantly provided with Cocoa Nuts in abundance – Bread Fruit & other things were also offer’d us – and with the most seeming hospitality and good humor – On our way we stopp’d at several houses, the Owners of whom were happy to see us and to offer us every thing his house afforded – amongst which they seldom forgot to offer their wives & daughters – So eager were all ranks to do us any piece of Service that I have seen them quarrel who shou’d Fan you as you wilted & for this they expected nothing – thinking themselves well paid if they thought you were pleas’d with their assiduacy and a Couple of Beads after all this wou’d perfect their happiness – In the Evening we return’d well pleased with our     
                                                        
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our days’ excursion – At night Capt.n Vancouver entertain’d the Royal Family – and a multitude of Spectators with a large display of Fireworks – the Ships having previously fir’d Guns – and the Fired pieces on shore three rounds loaded with round and Grape Shot – this part of the Evenings Exhibition both astonish’d and delighted the Natives – which they express’d by the most woundrous shouts and cries; - the fireworks astonished them exceedingly – but at these they did not appear So much pleased as frightened – Pomarré particularly was frightened, but his eldest wife was so much the reverse that with great Courage she set off some of the Sky Rockets Our fine pleasant weather continued and nothing material happend till the 10th – when a Grand Heeva – or entertainment of Music, Singing & dancing was given by Pomarré – The Theatre was a clear spot of ground near the Tents – the performers consisted of four Men and a Woman – and the Vocal & instrumental performers were two Men with Drums, two with Flutes and two with their own voices – To this Heeva a kind of Prologue was spoken by an elderly man, or rather chanted, accompanied by the two Drums – it was addressed to Capt.n Vancouver supposing him Pommaré – after this the Woman came forward and perform’d a kind of Dance accompanied by Music. the Drums giving beat with the Men’s fingers instead of Sticks, and join’d

 

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join’d by the Flutes and Voices produced a very pleasing Harmony – After the woman had danced a considerable time in part of which she was accompanied by a Boy – a kind of Comic Baletta was perform’d by three men and the Boy, which if we could judge from the unbounded applause with which it was receiv’d by the audience was well perform’d – and contain’d much humor. – The subject seem’d to be the haughty imperious behaviour of a very great Chief to a poor blind man who came to his house to beg for Charity and whom he was going to punish till prevented by the interference of the other performers - the Dialogue was Sung or Chaunted in a slow harmonious manner, - and before the Entertainment broke up, the performer’s Singly moved towards our places and received presents of Beads & other trinkets. – As to this Heeva, Captain Cook has given a very accurate description of it in his Voyage, and has given Some Drawings of it, done by M.r Webber, that approach the reality as near as it is possible; the Dress, the Attitude and in short the every thing is most accurately depicted in his drawings  The motions of the Body in their dancing must be extremely fatiguing, - and the movements of their hands – and some of their attitudes shewed an infinute degree of grace & elegance the only part to us unpleasing, but which seem’d in the opinion of the majority of the audience to heighten  the performance was the action of the.................... .............................Girl was exceedingly expert; they kept the most exact time with the music, which from time to time grew quicker till at last the Dancers dropt as if faint with fatigue. The

 

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The Dress of the Woman was truly Beautiful – and she shifted it twice during the performance – The first consisted of a Body of very fine White Cloth with a red edge, which reach’d from just above the breast to the middle, it was drawn very tight round the Body – and the ends which were of a considerable length were judiciously brought under each arm and then form’d into those wings which have so fine an effect in M.r Webber’s drawing, and display a fine taste and fancy:- The Petticoat or  Skirt which reach’d from the middle to the Ground consisted of a Vast quantity of fine Cloth and contrived so as to have the appearance of one of the very large Hoops worn by the Ladies in England; the outside Cloth of it differ’d from the Body being a very handsome White Ground with broad Red Stripes. her Arms were not at coverd, - but on the Breasts were neat little Tufts composed of dark Pidgeon’s feathers that had a wonderfully frilly affect. – The Second dress was if  possible still more beautiful, - the outside Peticoats being removed another appear’d of fine White Cloth, and roun’d her middle was tied a Belt composed of the Glossy Pigeons & Cock’s feathers, thickly & closely wrought, Suspended from this Belt were several Tails (or Tassles) about two feet long, of the same workmanship as the Belt - this last dress is exactly as represented in the drawing – but the .........................in the Plate we did not see, - and I rather suppose that article of Dress is only suffer’d to be worn by the Royal performers        
   

 

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performers – for the Dances more particularly noticed in Cook’s Voyage were perform’d by the King’s Sisters – We departed much pleased and gratified with this Nouvelle Entertainment
Young Otoo, who on account of his being under age, was prohibited going on board either of the Vessels, continued making great presents to the two Captains, - and taking a great liking to our Shoes ( for he constantly wore old ones that he had picked up on the Beach) M.r Broughton gave him a new pair, - which infinitely pleased him – Yet, he never cou’d put them to the ground, for when ever he went from home, he was carried on a Man’s shoulders -, Pomarrés presents were likewise very great, and as the returns were also liberal, and of greater value here, Capt.n V. was requested by him to make him a large Strong Chest to contain his Riches – this was therefore immediately Set about.  Both Ships being in want of Wood, Axes were lent to Some of the Principal Chiefs, who contracted to Supply a sufficient Quantity – and it was found the most advantageous plan – The Trees used to this purpose were the Evée or apple Tree – and burnt tolerably  -
11th My friend Puida brought me this Morning a magnificent Taoumé or Breast plate – together with a large Hog – and the Queen brought me a large quantity of fine Cloth with a Hog & other things, telling me at the same time that she had a Pari or Mourning Dress making for

 

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for me, which she wou’d bring in a few days.- The Queen’s sudden marks of Friendship & attention I believe may attribute to a Fowling piece that hung in my Cabin, and at which I often observed she look’d with wishful eyes, & giving many hints that She shou’d like to have it, but all this did not procure her the Gun, for though I should not have refused her it had it been in my power to give it particular orders were given on board both Ships against bartering with any kind of Ammunition or Firearms.
In the Evening Matuara – mahow ( the Sick Chief of Eimeo) and his wife – came alongside - and although he was unable to move himself – he requested to come on board and Sleep that night – which being of course granted, he was hoisted in, in a Chair – and a Bed made up for him, word was immediately sent to Pomarre – and he immediately return’d with the Messenger, and as usual Slept by him all night. In the Morning they all set out for the Palace at Oparré, from where this poor Man never return’d –
The 12th being a very fine day I took another walk into the Country to see my friend – with whom I intended to dine He met us at the entrance of the Village with every mark of joy – and when we told him we had come to dine with him, he welcomd us most heartily; ......................this visit, he had nothing then ready, however, a Fowl was soon roasted, and set before us, together with some Hot

 

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Hot Bread Fruit & Taro, and a desert of Plantains, Cocoa Nuts & Apples. – Our Dinner was served up in the cleanest manner possible – A clean mat was first spread upon the Ground and covered over with fresh Plantain leaves, - in the Centre was placed the Fowl ( which by the bye was very well done) on a clean Broad leaf – the other articles were disposed of regularly on each side, before each person were plac’d two Calibashes, one containing Fresh & the other salt Water - ( this last being used at this Island instead of Salt) no dinner coud have been serv’d up with more taste, and we very Soon gave the Man Sufficient proof of our approbation of it – tho’ to be sure the Fowl was rather tough, having been alive, killd & eaten in the Space of 20 minutes – On our way back we pass’d a large House, and hearing some Music we enter’d it - we found a very numerous audience assembled – besides great numbers listening outside, but their attention seem’d so much rivetted to the Concert, that they took no notice of us, - we Seated ourselves near Huripia who was there. This Musical Heeva lasted about an hour; the Instrumental Performers were two Drums & four Flutes, and the Vocal Performers were three men – One of these last who .............. ..............................................pronounced some short sentences – in a Slow solemn Chant after which the rest join’d and gradually rising their voices and quickening the time till each verse or part ended with the
                                                                                
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the greatest energy – the Vocal Performers having stopp’d the Instrumental Performers went on with a kind of symphony till the Leader commenced the next verse, and so on – what the Subject was I could not find out but there were no women present –
On the 13th Captain Broughton with a party of the Officers of both Ships, Set out on an excursion to Oparré – thither they went by water along with Watty and his Wife – whose guests during their trip they were to be – They were scarce gone when  intellegence was sent to Pomarré ( who was at that time at the Camp) of the death of Matuara – mahow. Pomarre who was much distress’d at this piece of news, sett off immediately for the Morai where the deceased lay, attended by his wives & sisters – he was Saluted on leaving the Camp with the Guns at that place, and on passing the Ships by 4 Guns from each – Certain Ceremonies were to take place at the morai at which all the Royal Family were to attend, together with a train of the principal Chiefs on the Island – In consequence of the decease of this great man the district of Oparre was Taboo’d for 3 days and a White Flag was hoisted at each extreme of the district showing the .........................This Taboo signifies a religious restriction or prohibition the violating of which is punish’d with death The restrictions in this instance were, that no fires or lights of any kind were

 

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were to be burnt,- nor any communication by Water to take place – for the Space of three days within the Boundaries mark’d out.
This Taboo however did not prevent our friends Walking around from Oparré to us – and we were as abundantly supplied with all kinds of refreshments as we were before
On the 15th – the prohibition against purchasing Curiosities was taken off both Ships Companies, and Bows & Arrows, Spears, Cloth &e &e were eagerly purchased by us – and as eagerly disposed of for trinkets by the Natives.- About Noon the Captain & his party return’d from the expedition, which had been of much pleasure and amusement, and they spoke very highly of Watty’s Hospitality and attention, he took care to provide them with every thing that coud either contribute to their comfort or convenience – and all this without any parade or shew  - but merely from an idea that it was incumbent on him to treat his guests well; His House was large & commodious – and as he was excessively fond of Ava – and always indulged himself freely in large portions of that intoxicating Stuff – his garden which was close to his house was well Stocked with that Article – He entertain’d them with ...........................................................................his House – some of which were very Curious expelutions but as they bordered much on indelicacy  - I shall forbear giving

 

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giving any description of them, let it suffice to say, that in Some parts of the Women’s performance ‘All their Native Charms were seen” – The last day of their being out they could scarcely get anything but Cocoa Nuts to eat on account of the Taboo.- They were present at some parts of the Ceremony performed on account of Matuara’s death – The Body was enbalm’d and laid on a stage erected for the purpose on a large Double Canoe wrapped up in Red Cloth – Offerings were made by the Priests, to the Eatooa or God. – and accompanied by long prayers chanted by the Priests. - A small Red feather’d Bird being carefully taken out of a Cloth by Mowree the High Priest, an offering of a Cocoa Nut was made to it. – at the Same time a long prayer was Chanted in which was repeated several times the names of the Officers present – In this way, & with frequent repetitions of these Ceremonies , the Body was to lye some time and then deposited in one of the Morai’s where the Erees or Chiefs alone are buried – The widow of Matuara as is the Custom in Such cases, - at his death cut the forehead with a Shark’s tooth till it Bled freely, and after repeating the practice the usual number of times which I believe is after each religious Ceremony – makes an end of her outward grief but except this Custom........................................................................................................hear of any unnecessary wailings ; or ostentatious grief – although I am confident that at this Man’s death, his widow 

 

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widow, and Pomarré felt as much real Grief & Sorrow, as is consistent with a good wife for a Husband she had respected, and with a friend for one he esteem’d –
I cannot drop the Subject without paying a due compliment to both the widow & Pomarré – their attention to the dying chief with the pains they took to contribute to his comfort and relief to the last moment together with the Anxiety of their Minds did honor to their feelings & Surely Speaks highly for these people who may be said to  be in a State of Nature without Cultivation or refinement
About the 17th – two Natives were detected privately Stealing on board the Discovery – they immediately jump’d overboard and made for the shore, but a Boat quickly outook them and they were taken to the Camp where Capt.n Vancouver was; - tho the theft was but trifling – considering it but proper to put an early stop to Such practices – Capt.n V. punish’d them in Sight of their Countrymen who were there present in great Number, and first shaving their heads close, they were flogged with a dozen lashes each – Young Otoo Pomarré & his Brothers were all present, and admired the justness of the Punishment, but whether it produc’d a good  effect ......................
In the Afternoon the two Captains went to Oparré where Matuara’s Corpse lay, to be present at a ceremony to be again observed, and to pay the last honors to this great

 

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Chief – When they came to the Beach they were met by Pomarré, the Widow and a vast Concourse of Chiefs, Priests &e. they were conducted to the Body where much the same ceremonies being repeated as Seen before - Capt.n Vancouver order’d the Boats Crew up to the place with the Musquets and fired four Vollies over the Body – and then taking a large piece of Scarlet Cloth, he wrapped it round the Widow – The ceremony over they return’d on board and the Taboo being over we were Soon crowded with Canoes –
The 18th The Queen according to her promise brought me the Mourning dress  - I took her into my Cabbin where she again cast a longing look at the Gun – but I explain’d to her that I coud not give it her – and presenting her with a large Shirt and a few other articles She departed highly pleased – I was this day uncommonly lucky in receiving presents – for Peggy Stewart came with a Pari ( a mourning dress) which she gave to Mr. Johnstone and a Taoume (or Breast plate) for me, In return I put a White shirt on her. – Indeed when she gave me this she did not expect any thing in return, for she wou’d scarcely take the Shirt, telling me that the Breast plate was a return for what I had before given her – she was .......................................................for the following day. She brought a Pig & a quantity of Fruit Taro &e. to me, for which She wou’d positively take nothing. Here

 

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Here I cannot help mentioning a circumstance that happen’d, which I think discovered an amiable trait in the Character of a Young Girl - who among others had claim’d Tyoship with me – she happen’d to be present when all those things were given to me, - at the time I observ’d she appear’d dejected, and distress’d but shortly after – on going upon Deck I found her in Tears; this I cou’d not account for, but after repeated inquiries into the Cause, She at last acknowledged that it was because she had it not in her power to make me such valuable presents as she had seen the other women make me; She said that she was not so rich as either of the others, therefore cou’d not give what (was it in her power) she wou’d do with as willing heart as anyone. Though I was sorry this poor Girls feelings were so much distress’d on Such an occasion, I cou’d not help at the Same time admiring what I construed into so great a proof of a generous mind.- She every day brought something or other, yet as I imagin’d she must in Some measure distress herself or her family by so doing – I took care She should ever have more than the Value of them
....................................................................................................................
19th         About this time the Wood contracted for by the Chiefs, being all cut, the Axes were desired to be delivered up, which was immediately complied with by all the Chiefs

 

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except by one whose name was Moré, - who having got three only return’d one, positively refusing to give the other two up, desiring them for payment of his trouble – as this was a piece of presumption and impudence not to be pass’d over, Capt.n Vancouver sent to him, to inform him that if he did not immediately return them he shou’d take them from him by force, on this - One more was return’d with a declaration that he wou’d not give up the other – Capt.n V being determin’d to have them all again sent him word that if he did not instantly send back the other, he wou’d burn his house down about his Ears and every thing belonging to him. - he refus’d but hearing that preparations were making to really burn down his House that night, he very quickly sent the Axe back – and never after shew’d his face on board tho’ he had before been on very intimate terms with all the Captains – and had he acted as the other Chiefs did would have been handsomely paid for the trouble in Cutting the Wood. –
For about a Week past Some Robberies were nightly committed about the Tents, of different things, but which very improperly were taken little or notice of  This night however, a Bag of Linen containing among other articles upwards of a dozen Shirts, belonging to Capt.n B – was taken away – the Bag was suffer’d to remain outside the Tent all night, which was certainly wrong. This


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This was such a daring Robbery that immediate notice was taken of it Pomarré & his Brothers were made acquainted with it and promised every exertion of their part to recover the Stolen goods & the Thief. One of the Natives who had staid at the Tents as an assistant to the Officers Servants was examin’d - he laid the Robbery on one of the Girls that had Slept in the Tents, but this was known to be an utter falsehood, not Supposing from this Man’s former Conduct that he was at all concern’d in it – little more was Said to him, but to the Surprize of every person – he the next day disappear’d which gave Sufficient grounds to Suspect he was a party concern’d  Every thing that cou’d be thought of was done, & every inducement held out for a return of the Stolen goods; every house in Matavai was threaten’d to be burnt to the ground all had no effect – for nothing was brought back
Huripia had prepared a grand Heeva in compliment to Captain Vancouver which was to be performed at the Tents in the Evening - the performers were dress’d and going to begin but Capt.n V conceiving that this might perhaps be meant to divert his thoughts from the Robbery business wou’d not Suffer it to be performed – expressing at the same time his Anger at the offence & a determination to proceed to extremities till the Cloaths were restored – Hurupia then said he wou’d immediately go in quest of them, provided Capt.n     

  

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Capt.n Vancouver would lend him a Musquet with Powder & Ball  – the Musquet was not refused him, but no powder was given him, however away went Huripia with the Musquet.
The next day – Saturday – Huripia return’d leading Tom – (the native who had run away the preceding day) with a Halter round his Neck; - he was only bought back on Suspicion, for no Cloathes came with him – Another native was taken up & detain’d on Suspicion –
On the Natives seeing this they fled, and numbers went away in Canoes to Oparre, taking with them their property, - others went up into the Mountains, and in short nothing but horror and Confusion seem’d to reign among them. – As all the Canoes that lay near Point Venus were observed to be making off – a party was dispatched to stop them, but by the time they arrived at the Pt. every Canoe was off but one, which they Stopp’d but as the natives were coming down in numbers towards her She was suffer’d to pass. Pomarré’s wife who by the bye was at this time very far gone with Ava no Britanee, was the only native remaining at the Tents except the prisoners, - a large concourse of people appear’d at the opposite side of the River and .............................................................................................................................................
them. Not long after Pomarré who had been absent during the bustle, apear’d among the Crowd & calling out for Captn.    
   

 

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Capt.n Vancouver, who immediately appear’d and asked him if he was not his friend, and if he was  - why he did not come “over to him” – to this Captn.V replied “I am your friend but you are afraid to come over to me.” On this Pomarre instantly waded across the River and slept all night in the Marquee. None of the Cloathes were ever return’d and Tom & the other prisoner were given their liberty the day of the Ship’s sailing. –
About this time another affair happen’d that raised much bustle and Confusion. On the night of the 19th Toweraroo disappeared – he had many different times express’d a desire to remain at Otaheite with which he was enamoured, and Seem’d to conceive he wou’d be much happier than he should be in his own Country – and this he had told Capt.n. Vancouver, and his friend M.r Menzies but they both set their faces against it - and  would by no means listen to any thing of the kind. – on this opposition he was heard to say that he wou’d run away – and he surely kept his word. – He had attached himself strongly to a very fine young woman (and a woman of Rank) by her means had from time to time convey’d all his Cloathes etc on Shore – reserving in the Cash a Broad Sword, a pair of Pistols & a Rifle .........................................................by Col.l Gordon at the Cape of God Hope) and with all these articles - in the dead of the Night he dropt himself over the

 

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the Ship’s Bows, and attempted with these in his hands to Swim ashore, but finding them too heavy and the distance considerable he was obliged to let them all go to the Bottom.
Pomarre & Huripia were threatenend much by Capt.n Vancouver if he was not brought back, in consequence of which they Set out in Search of him – During all this time Watty and his Wife and Several of the principal Chiefs were absent – tho’ we were convinced that many of them had no hand in the Causes of these disturbances – On the 22nd however Capt.n  Broughton & Lieut.t Mudge went in quest of these absentees - to take leave of them and part good friends – as we were expected to sail in a Couple of days They found Watty & his Wife & many more Chiefs at Some distance from the Camp. Watty embraced his friend M.r B with great joy and after a Short Stay – they all set out for the Camp, but when they came opposite to it at the bank of the River – Several people apprehensive of his safety arm’d with Clubs and Spears got round Watty & endeavour’d to prevent his going on to the Camp, altho’ it was evident he wou’d readily have gone of his own accord; - After various Struggles on his part & those that opposed him, he at last was suffererd to go over, in M.r B’s remaining as a hostage. His wife followed on M.r Mudge’s remaining in her Stead - but very Shortly every one went over – Watty with .........Captain’s ..........on board the Discovery and now every thing was as before, for all the Canoes & the people who had fled had return’d and a very brisk trade 

 

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trade was carried out for all kinds of refreshments, both on shore and longside the Vessels. – An Axe bought 3 fine Hogs and a pair of Scissors, Six fine Fowls; and though Capt.n  Cook  mentions that when any dispute or disturbance arose they cou’d get no refreshments from the Natives – we had at this time more Natives along side & more traffic going forward then we had seen since the first day of our arrival. –
In the Evening the Tents were all struck, and our Cutter and new small Bost with everything else were got on board      
23rd      As we were to sail the following day my faithful Tyo brought me his last present, which as ever was the case was beautiful – This Man had rendered me many excellent services, and deserved every return I could make him, he washed my Linnen during the whole of our stay; and I never missed the most trivial article; he express’d his sorrow very strongly at our departure. –
This morning – M.r Broughton accompanied by M.r Menzies at the request of Capt.n  Vancouver – attended by a Guard of Marines went in a Boat to Oparre in search of Toweraroo, with directions in case of not getting him, to bring back Pomarre; but before they got half way they met Pomarre & Huripia  bringing Toweraroo back to the Ship – He was dressd in the manner of the Natives of the Country – After we quitted the Island he acknowledge that it was the persuasions of Pomarre & Hiruia that induced him to run away; and their reasons for this step were that he would be of service to them in their

 

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their Wars, not only from his possessing such a Stock of Fire Arms &e.-  but that they conceived he could repair and put in order the fire Arms they possessd – if this account is true – I really cannot blame these poor people for wishing to have such a man among them, nor upon reflection do I think Toweraroo to blame – he was not going back to England, and it was very well known that he anticipated no great happiness from going home to his Native Country where therefore cou’d be happier than at such a charming place as Otaheite. – But on the other hand, Capt.n Vancouver was I believe ordered to take him back to his Native Country, under an idea that it wou’d be of service to it, and give his Countrymen a better idea of the Country he had visited than they cou’d from from the accounts of the Vessels that occasionally call at the Islands, - and he was the only Sandwich Islander who had been in England, and return’d back to his Country He had been brought to England in one of the Vessels employ’d in the American Fur Trade, - and was put to School and after a stay of five years was sent back in the Discovery he was always treated very well, - and had behaved himself on the passage to the infinite satisfaction of every body When he came to Otaheite, he conducted himself much in the same foolish manner that Omai did, he preferr’d the Company of those who flatterd him to his face, but no doubt laugh’d at him behind his back – and many of those as may be supposed were of the lower Class of People - He
     

       

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He was vain and lavish’d all his Stock of private trade among the Class of people I have just mention’d to satisfy his vanity – When he left England he was furnish’d with an excellent Stock of Cloathing, but this as I have already taken notice of, he convey’d on shore, and never recover’d any of it.-
Both Pomaree and Hirupia bought with them a large Fleet of Canoes laden with immense quantities of all kinds of refreshments – as presents to the Captains but there was considerably more than we cou’d take in Watty & his Brother Hirupia with their Wives came on board As the Captains’ Linnen was generally believed to have been stolen by some person in Watty’s district, and he being M.r Broughton’s Tyo, he was requested to go and look after them, this he promised to do, and left the Ship for that purpose, but we had great reason to suppose that he troubled himself very little about the matter, and altho’ he took So very little pains to recover them, we were perfectly confident he knew nothing of the business – and had no concern in it, nor did this inattention arise from any design to profit by the theft, and have a share of the Booty after we were gone, - of this we likewise acquitted him; but it merely arose from an indolent disposition, - he cou’d not take the trouble, his whole time & thoughts being taken up in Eating & Drinking &e.  - His charming Wife also engross’d a considerable share of his attention, for he seem’d to possess a very tender affection for her. – We were therefore sorry that     

 

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that a man whom every person admired – and who had all the time of our stay behaved so very friendly, and conducted himself with so much propriety should at the very time when most was expected of him, shew himself inattentive and I may add unfriendly – as M.r B was his acknowledged friend, but the reason I am confident is what I have mention’d. Even his Brothers shew’d their displeasure at his behaviour. –
Pomarre slept this night being the last, on board the Discovery, and Hirupia & his wife in M.r Broughton’s Chatham.
24th        By day light this morning we were Surrounded with Canoes in great numbers, bringing vast quantities of Vegetables, Fruit Hogs &e Watty though he did not get the Cloaths, came with his Wife & her Mother, with a large present of Hogs, Fruit, Taro &     
Sugar Cane, - About 10 Oclock we began to Unmoor and about 11 we were under weigh – The Discovery who had got away before us was lying to the offing when she was abreast of One Tree Hill; Pomarre left the Ship, and was Saluted with four Guns. – As soon as the Natives saw our sails filled, every Countenance was dejection and sorrow (and indeed I can scarcely tell which were most so, ours or their’s) – When we cou’d no longer take the things in they brought off to us many of them threw them into the Ship – Several actually Shed tears at our departure, and the Tyos were calling out to their friends.

 

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friends from all Quarters, as long as they could be heard, and cou’d we have thoroughly  understood what they said and meant, I am sure they wish’d us a good voyage and all happiness and prosperity. –
Peggy Stewart was one of the last who left us – she had come on board in the morning  and brought a present of Hogs and fruit; - She was distress’d exceedingly at our going away; - when we were under weigh and She saw she must leave us, with a heavy heart, and her eyes swimming in Tears, she took an affectionate leave of every body but particularly M.r Johnstone & me, she said she lov’d the English and wished we would come back and live at Otaheite. – Just before she went away, she came into my Cabbin – and ask’d me the same question she she had often done, whether I thought Stewart would be hung. – I told her I cou’d not tell, - perhaps he would not – she then said “If he is alive when you return tell him that you saw his Peggy and his little Charlotte, and that they were both well and tell him to come to Otaheite, and live with them or they will be unhappy.” – She then burst into Tears and with the deepest regret forced herself into her Canoe and as long as we could see her She kept waving her hand.
Poor Peggy was not a Beauty, nor had she that in her ............................................ a man to turn Pirate; but she was possess’d of so much sensibility an affable, agreeable disposition together with a        

 

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a Sweetness of manners that upon a Short acquaintance made up for the deficiency of personal Beauty. She was immoderately fond of her little Child and seldom went without it.
As we got up with the Discovery, Watty & Hirupia with their Wives were all that were remaining in board, for the Breeze was fresh, and soon separated the small Canoes from us. – Watty’s Canoe we had in tow. - To Hirupia who had always been extremely friendly & useful – M.r B. made a handsome farewell present – among other things – he gave him a light Horseman’s Helmet  with which he was so overjoy’d that he jump’d about like a Madman – he was also given a little Powder, as he had a Musquet that was given to him some Years ago. – But to Watty, the Captain then gave nothing; but made up a present for him, insisting as he was going on board the Discovery to give it to him there – in order that Capt.n  Vancouver might explain to him, that it was not in return for his friendship but for the Articles of Provisions, Fruit &e. he had supplied the Ship with. – To his Wife however the Captain gave presents in the presence of Watty, which seem’d the more to vex him and I dare say at that time, heartily wish’d he had exerted himself more about the Cloathes.
The Capt.n  now went on board the Discovery with these two Chiefs, and at his request Hirupia was saluted with four Guns – When they got on board the presents
   

 

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for Watty was produced & given him – at the same time Capt.n V. explain’d to him that this was in payment  for his Hogs &e.  - that he acted with more vigilence in his search after the Cloathes, he shou’d besides this have received as large a present at a token of friendship. Watty however did not seem to pay much attention to this speech, being busily employ’d in looking at the different articles, - which except the Powder was the same as his Brother got. – They all soon after took their leave, but not before all parties embraced & they parted good friends.
Thus did we leave this Charming place, and its friendly, happy, Inhabitants – amd tho’ latterly we had Some little dispute with them, yet the general tenor of their conduct was such as reflects the highest honor on them. Too much cannot be said in their praise, Hospitable, Generous; always pleas’d & happy in pleasing; never in the least degree insolent or quarrelsome; nor ever taking advantage of you, in any situation or action, was what we found them throughout. Never were people more concern’d at parting, than we were with these good people; and they with us. –
In all societies there are some bad members – Some few thefts were committed, but they were fewer than might be expected, considering of what great value the most trifling article of ours is to them and the opportunities they had.

 

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January
Having now given the occurrences which happen’d to fall under my observation at Otaheite, little more remains to be said by me. – Capt.n Wallis the discoverer of this Island, M.r Bougainville who came off next after him, Cap.t Cook who was here four times in the course of his Voyages and M.r Foster who was with him in his Second Voyage have already said whatever could be said on the Inhabitants, the Country, its productions &e. - all these Commanders were assisted by very able Men, who performed their duty and furnish’d the world with every observation worthy remark ; - anything I might therefore add would perhaps be considered superfluous, but collated from he accounts of the people above mentioned, of the first, I am not vain enough to suppose they woud judge wrongly; but of the last, namely Plagiarism, let me endeavour to acquit myself  - and assure those few that may read this that the following observations on Otaheite are my own; they will indeed speak for themselves, and that they are my own will not long be doubted. It was the request of my friends on leaving home, that I shoud commit an account of our transactions to paper with my opinions, thoughts &e. - of all places & people – therefore this is to be deem’d more as the performance of a duty, than a work of authority & exactness though I have inserted nothing but what fell immediately under my own knowledge, or what I coud collect from intelligent people at the Island.

116    
                     

Some general remarks on Otaheite


1792
January
As you approach the Island of Otaheite the Land has one of the most Beautiful, Luxuriant appearances the eye can wish to behold, The Mountains are extremely high & remarkable, covered with a delightful verdure, and interspersed with Wood to the Summits. – The whole Island is skirted with Plains, through which run Small Rivers of fresh water – and abounding with Cocoa  Nut, Bread fruit and other Trees – from the back of which the land gradually rises in Ridges between deep fertile Vallies. – It is among these plains at the foot of the Ridges, that the Habitations of the people are chiefly situated, - amongst groves of Trees that form a most pleasant delightful shade –
The Principal Trees that grow here, are the Cocoa Nut, the Bread fruit, the Plantain of which there are Several different sorts, a fruit which they call Evée & which very much resembles an Apple and the Oily Nuts which they make use of instead of Candles, call’d Pudue, - these Trees grow at a most agreeable desirable distance – as they afford Shelter from the Sun – and it is amidst those I say that their Habitations are situated – they do not seem to have any regular built villages or Towns, but their houses are scattered about as the place seems most convenient and agreeable to the Owners Some of the Houses are very large ................................according to the Rank of the Owner & the number of the Family Those of the most common Size are from 20 to thirty feet in length.    

 

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length – and from 12 to sixteen feet in breadth, they are of an Oval Shape; and in their construction admirably adapted to the Climate of the Country, they have no Walls, the Roof is closely and neatly thatched with large leaves – and perfectly tight, it rises from each Side and round the ends to a Sharp Ridge the Summit of which is about 10 or 12 feet from the ground, this roof is supported all round by Bamboo Canes – about the height of five or 6 feet from the ground – and plac’d at the distance of about two inches from each other. – and the Ridge is Supported by 3 or more pillers inside. The Roof overhangs the sides – in such a manner as effectually throws off the rain – The furniture of the Houses principally consists of Matts - laid over a Floor of soft clean grass – which are used to Sit and Sleep on – They have Pillows neatly made of a wood resembling Mahogany that are used by the men - in most of the Houses are large Chests which contains the most valuable part of their property – and their Cloth & Matts are hung upon Pegs driven into the Poles that support the Roof. - they are excessively neat and clean in the houses – never eating in them except in bad weather, at all other times they eat their Meals in the Area or Courtyard that surrounds the house under the shade of Some Spreading Tree.-
The men of Otaheite are in general above the middling size ...........................................I suppose were upwards of Six feet two inches high. – In their persons they are handsome, well proportion’d and Stoutly

 

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Stoutly made – and their  Countenances possess much openness, vivacity and expression – The Women are about the Middling Size of European Women, have fine delicate regular features – their faces in which in general we could not observe all that wonderful degree of Beauty which the different visitors have described – were nevertheless pretty, and Several that I saw very handsome: - their Countenances bespeak such Sweetness , Sensibility and expression, they have fine sparkling black Eyes, - their Teeth are beautifully White and regular, - their hands and Fingers remarkably delicate, tapering to the ends Small & neat; Their Hair which they take wonderful care of is jet Black, and is cut in the most becoming manner, - in the front it is curled across the top in neat rows which has a pretty effect, and behind, it hangs down a few inches below the Neck. – Though I say we were in general disappointed in the Beauty of the Women, yet had not so much been said of them by the different people who have written about them, some of whom have compar’d them to Europeans, we shou’d certainly have thought them very handsome. – The Men have also fine Eyes and Teeth.-
These people in their manners are free, open and sincere, in their dispositions, Mild, affectionate, generous & humane they are Hospitable to a degree, and in those who form’d attachments to us, we cou’d place the utmost confidence and reliance . – They have an astonishing flow of Animal Spirits and a very considerable stock of Chearfulness and good

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good humor, and it is not a little that will put them out of temper, or dispossess them of their gaity and good humor – Both men and women walk remarkably erect & gracefully.
They are very fond of amusements of which Dancing and Music seem to be their favourite – Except in the Dances of the superior kind, the Women seem in general to be the principal performers in that amusement And in the Musical entertainments, the Men in general seem to be the principal performers. I once saw a Musical Entertainment in which four men and three women perform’d, they were accompanied by 3 Flutes and two Drums At times the men sung by themselves, at other times the Women, and often all together, which was very harmonious. Almost all the Songs are on the Tender subject, which they accompany with actions and motions suitable.
Some of their Dances they also accompany with Songs of the Amorous kind, with actions corresponding, which they perform with an energy that raises their desires to such heights that they frequently break off and retire to realize those pleasures, which before they only sung of. –
Having little or scarcely any laborious work to undergo, Nature having very bountifully supplied them with every thing necessary for their Subsistence and their happiness and having ......................................................................................nations, except the Casual visits of the English they have few wants, - it is therefore not much to be wondered        

 

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wondered at that they are rather indolent and idle. Pleasure seems to be their great object and aim – and to it they Sacrifice every thing.
Swimming in the surf is a great amusement with them and affords them much pleasure, - they fire Arrows for Amusement, I never saw them fire at a mark, but they generally stood at the bottom of a Hill, and the height they sent the Arrow appeared  to be the great object:
I cannot pretend to tell the distance they threw them, it Seem’d great, and they exerted themselves so much that the String of the Bow always broke, and with such violence did it snap over the Man’s Arm – that it drew the Blood. – Throwing the Spear is another amusement of the Mens, they do it dexterously and are very good Marksmen.
They are exceedingly clean in their persons, regularly bathing in fresh water several times a day and constantly after every meal.
The dress of the Men are different according to their Rank. – The Fowtow wearing only a common Maro and the Erees or chiefs – a kind of Petticoat that reaches from the Navel to the Knees, bedsides this they have in bad weather and in the cool of the Evening – a large loose piece of Cloth ........................................................................dress in the same manner – they wear a kind of Petticoat like the Men’s, that reaches from about the Middle to a little     

                                

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January
little below the knees, and always wear a piece of large fine Cloth that covers the body, going over the left shoulder and under the right, so that the right arm is at liberty and uncover’d – The Women wear in general on their heads, as an ornament, a garland composed of Red, Yellow and White flowers, but principally  of the Odifereous White flower they call Yearree, and is in high estimation they have also one of these Flowers Stuck in their Ear.
Both Men and Women have One Ear perforated, they make Earrings of the Beads given them, and dispose them with infinite taste – They are immoderately fond of White Linnen Shirts, but particularly the women, which most of our Gentlemen had sufficient reason to know; these they ware, with their Earrings, thought themselves array’d in the height of Grandeur, but these were the only articles of the presents they received that we ever saw a Second time.
When the Island was first visited, the principal Animal food, eaten by the people of the Country was Dog, but their taste now is a good deal altered, they eat Dogs flesh but seldom, Pork being the food now more usually eaten by those who can afford it – and there are few that can Eat pork more than two or three times a week.

  • The Inhabitants live principally upon Fruit & Vegetables ............................................ Bread fruit which we did not relish. Fish they are very fond of, but they do not catch them in any great abundance. The

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January    
The Women are under many restrictions in the Eating way that to us appear’d ridiculous & superstitious; they always Eat separate from the men, and never in their presence, except those of the first rank – they eat with the Men, and it is only a few of those that are suffered to eat Pork,
the other women are Taboo’d  (or restricted) from Eating Pork and particular kinds of Plantains and Fish.-
Death is often the punishment if the Taboo is broken tho’ and when that does not take place, the chiefs Seize on every Article of property belonging to the Criminal and her parents – notwithstanding all this – the Women who staid on board the Ships – made little Scruple to eat Pork, and every thing else that was Taboo’d; - but this was at night after all the Men were left the Ships.
Pomarre as I have already mentioned had chang’d his name, his eldest son who was only a Boy of about 12 Years of Age, having for some time taken his former name Otoo – and with it also took on the Government and was now the acknowledged King, but being very young the public business was now carried on by his father till he arrived at a certain age when he was no longer to be carried on Men’s Shoulders; but invested with the Royal Maro, and took into his own hands the Government .............................................This period they told us was to take place in about ten months – when all the Chiefs and great people were to assemble at the Court of Oparre where
                                          

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January
where there was to be “Worau Worau te prau” – a great deal of talking previous to his investment &e &e –
The word Pomarre was formerly the Otaheitian word for an assassin, but in consequence of the Old King taking it for his name, it is now death to any person to use it in its former meaning. –
The Chiefs seem’d to exercise very little authority over the Common people, and we saw no respect paid to any but Pomarre, and Otoo – to these every person whatever uncover’d, - that is, both Men and Women stripp’d themselves as low as the breast; in this they are very strict and even Pomarre’s Wife the Mother of Otoo, stript  to her Son.
He is always approach’d and spoken to with the greatest respect, and though he is Young, he knows his Rank well enough to give himself airs; - I have seen his Uncle Hirupia Stand before him, Speaking to him in the most humble manner for a quarter of an hour, and he scarcely deign’d to give him an answer, but cast a frown at him; - but he is a fine handsome Boy, and carries in his appearance all that dignity & majesty becoming his Rank and Situation. – Though he is often visited by the Garrison, yet such are the laws respecting Royal Minors that he could not enter the Tents nor cou’d he go on board the Ships, for did he once do either no person after dare venture to enter the place he had visited – The Same law extends to all houses of the Country except the Royal palace for we learnt that if he entered any house but his

 

124              

             
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January       
his own, on his departure from it the house and furniture must be immediately burnt down –            
At this time there were two parties on the Island and Pomarre’s party were in daily expectation of a revolt being made by the other party; this being the Situation of affairs, Hirupia who is reckon’d to be the greatest Warrior on the Island was station’d on the look-out as near to the other party as possible. –
These people remember Cook and speak of him with the greatest regret at his untimely death, indeed I have seen some of the elder Branches of the Royal Family who remember’d him in his first Voyage Shed tears on Speaking of him.
The productions of the Island are Bread fruit, Cocoa Nuts, Bananas, Plantains, a fruit resembling an Apple call’d Ivee, Taro, Yams & Sugar Cane, together with the intoxicating hot root call’d Ava; They have I understood Potatoes but I never saw any, some Shaddocks left here by Capt.n  Cook, were brought off to us, but they were run to seed almost. The Animals natural to the Country are Hogs, Dogs & Fowls – Capt.n Cook left here a breed of Goats that have thrived well –
The only productions of the earth they cultivate with any degree of care are the Plantains & Bananas, the Taro & the Ava –The Bread fruit they never look after and it is their principal subsistence, but it requires no
                                                   
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January
no care; - they pay some little attention to the young Cocoa Nut Trees, - and take great care of the Cloth plant. Of Yams and Sugar Cane they have but a small quantity .
The Breed of Hogs here is far superior to anything I ever saw of the kind , both in size and quality, we got many that weigh’d when dead and clean’d  upwards of two hundred weight, and of about thirty that we carried to Sea, there were few that weigh’d less than 140 lbs w.t – the meat is delicious, and that of the largest was in general Whitest and best flavour’d – very little care is required to be taken with them, as they live under the Bread fruit Trees – from which the fruit may literally be said to drop into  their mouths: -
The Dogs they have are a very poor ugly race and what is extraordinary are neither docile or affectionate –
The Fowls are excellent, and they have them in tolerable quantities – during our stay – I suppose upon an average both ships were supplied (including which we carried to Sea) with 16 or 18 Dozen of Fowls.-
Capt.n Vancouver took away some Goats from this to leave at the Sandwich Islands.
Although the Natives of Otaheite are extremely fond of Salt, they have no such thing as Salt ponds. –
The Manufactures at this Island are not very numerous, neither are they ............................................principal articles of their Manufacture are Cloth, Matts, J.Rope, they make Fishhooks of the Shell of the large Pearl Oyster. – their fishing lines & Rope are made from the

 

126
                                                         

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January
the Fibres of the Cocoa Nut, and a species of the Flax plant. Their Spears & clubs are made from a hard Wood some what resembling Mahogany - they likewise make very Neat Baskets and Strong Fishing Netts. –
The most valuable Artificial Curiosities among them are the Taoume or Breastplate, and the Pari or Mourning dress – they are both principally Composed of the Glossy Pidgeon’s feathers, the Pearl Oyster Shell, and Small Shark’s teeth – they are very strongly and nicely work’d and display much tatse & elegance. The natives bring off some handsome Shells for Sale – and among them abundance of what are called Tyger Shells –
The Language of the people is soft and harmonious being principally composed of Vowels, - and altho’ Capt.n Cook remarks that it is very copious, – yet they have many words to each of which they have several different meanings and some of them so very opposite to one another, that it naturally strikes every person as highly absurd; for instance “Poeroa” means Sickness and it also means death – if a man is Sick he is Poeroa; if he is dead he is Poeroa; if a Bird is wounded - or Shot in either case it is Poeroa.  The word formerly used for “Dead” was Matte, but Otoo having chosen that for one of his names, it is now death for any person to make use of in its former meaning – The word ...........................................................................................................................Fish hook and there are many more instances of the like kind.-
It is surprising with what facility every person on board

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January
on board learn’d the Language; - we made ourselves well understood in the Course of a couple of days, and before we left it there were many that could hold long conversations with the Natives; indeed a Language so easy of pronunciation, there being few Consonants to render it harsh - is easily learn’d, and particularly under such good tutors as these people are - for besides being bless’d with a considerable degree of patience, they have a happy manner of making themselves understood by Signs, - and if they observe you have a desire to acquire a knowledge of their Language, they are indefatigable in their exertions to instruct you. – They are proud of having any English words, - and those few that had any knowledge that way, are sure to let it be known whether what they say is to the purpose or not. – A man in the morning will accost you with “how d’ye do Sir” and in the next half hour at going away will bid you “Goodnight” One old Chief cou’d count from one to a hundred, and another in imitation of the Boatswain cou’d turn the hands up out Boats, but as most of those who had any of our words had learnt them of the Common Sailors, and as every one Knows what instructive tutors they are, they will not be surprised to hear that “Damn your Eyes” and such like expressions were most common among them. –
There are a few (and those are among the principal Chiefs) that have Fire Arms – they were presents from some of the Vessels that had been here before – But they did not appear to be so eager after Guns & Ammunition as a person might have supposed

 

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January
supposed;  Knowing how superior they are to their own Weapons those that had any Knew the Management of them perfectly well. I did not know more than two people  who ask’d for fire arms, - this circumstance in a great measure proves to me that they are a people not fond of being engaged in Broils & War, yet when they conceive that their rights are invaded – or that there is at any time sufficient just provocation - I imagine no people would take up Arms Sooner; nor no people behave more resolute or Courageous.-
I saw few, indeed Scarcely any Diseases among them. the Venereal disease was the principal, as we afterwards found out – for it was pretty general in both Ships after we quitted the Island, but in so slight a degree, that it did not hinder the people from doing their duty, and they were all well in a fortnight.
The Articles most in demand were besides White Shirts which I have already notic’d Red Cloth, Red Feathers, Axes, Scissors, Knives, files, looking Glasses & Colour’d & spotted Glass Beads (particularly Red) – Nails they did not care for and we did not part with twenty –
Besides the many Gardens laid out by people who had been here before us. – M.r Menzies during our Stay planted one, in the Grounds  belonging to Poeno the Eree or Chief of Matavai which is Situated  in one of the most charming Spots of the plain – just behind the River -
I have

 

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I have now dwelt a long time on Otaheite, and shall conclude my remarks on that place with only observing that I am confident – I have not done sufficient justice to the Country, its Inhabitants &e. – and this want of justice must be ascribed to want of ability. I have often felt much vexed that I could not paint in the Colours I wish’d, many Scenes and Situations that have been thrown into my view; - during my Stay at that delightful Island – but I refer my reader to Cook, Foster or Bougainville, the last of whom I shall only observe calls Otaheite New Cytherea -


   
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